St. Sixtus I
St. Sixtus I
    Pope St. Sixtus I
     Catholic_Encyclopedia Pope St. Sixtus I
    Pope St. Sixtus I (in the oldest documents, Xystus is the spelling used for the first three popes of that name), succeeded St. Alexander and was followed by St. Telesphorus. According to the "Liberian Catalogue" of popes, he ruled the Church during the reign of Adrian "a conulatu Nigri et Aproniani usque Vero III et Ambibulo", that is, from 117 to 126. Eusebius, who in his "Chronicon" made use of a catalogue of popes different from the one he used in his "Historia ecclesiastica", states in his "Chronicon" that Sixtus I was pope from 114 to 124, while in his "History" he makes him rule from 114 to 128. All authorities agree that he reigned about ten years. He was a Roman by birth, and his father's name was Pastor. According to the "Liber Pontificalis" (ed. Duchesne, I, 128), he passed the following three ordinances:
    (1) that none but sacred ministers are allowed to touch the sacred vessels;
    (2) that bishops who have been summoned to the Holy See shall, upon their return, not be received by their diocese except on presenting Apostolic letters;
    (3) that after the Preface in the Mass the priest shall recite the Sanctus with the people. The "Felician Catalogue" of popes and the various martyrologies give him the title of martyr. His feast is celebrated on 6 April. He was buried in the Vatican, beside the tomb of St. Peter. His Relics are said to have been transferred to Alatri in 1132, though O Jozzi ("Il corpo di S. Sisto I., papa e martire rivendicato alla basilica Vaticana", Rome, 1900) contends that they are still in the Vatican Basilica. Butler (Lives of the Saints, 6 April) states that Clement X gave some of his Relics to Cardinal de Retz, who placed them in the Abbey of St. Michael in Lorraine. The Xystus who is commemorated in the Canon of the Mass is Xystus II, not Xystus I. Acta SS., April, I, 531-4; Liber Pontificatis, ed. DUCHESNE, I (Paris, 1886), 128; MARINI, Cenni storici popolari sopra S. Sisto I, papa e martire, e suo culto in Aletri (Foligno, 1884); DE PERSIIS, Del pontificato di S. Sisto I, papa e martire, della translazione delle sue reliquie da Roma ecc., memorie (Alatri, 1884); BARMBY in Dict. Christ. Biog., s. v. Sixtus (2) I.
    MICHAEL OTT
    Transcribed by Scott Anthony Hibbs

The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VIII. — New York: Robert Appleton Company. . 1910.


Catholic encyclopedia.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Sixtus V. — Sixtus V. Sixtus V. (* 13. Dezember 1521 in Grottammare, Marken; † 27. August 1590 in Rom), bürgerlicher Name Felice Peretti di Montalto, war von 1585 bis 1590 Papst der katholischen Kirche …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Sixtus — (Ξύστος Xýstos ‚der Feine, Glatte‘) ist der Name folgender Personen: Sixtus (Bischof) (1. Jh. n. Chr.), erster Bischof von Reims Hl. Sixtus I. (115–125), Papst Hl. Sixtus II. (257–258), Papst Hl. Sixtus III. (432–440), Papst Sixtus IV.… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Sixtus V —     Pope Sixtus V     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► Pope Sixtus V     (FELICE PERETTI).     Born at Grottamare near Montalto, 13 December, 1521; elected 24 April, 1585; crowned 1 May, 1585; died in the Quirinal, 27 August, 1590. He belonged to a… …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Sixtus — was a Roman name, a corruption of the Greek name polytonic|Ξυστος, meaning polished, and originally Latinized Xystus. It is not to be confused with the common Roman name Sextus, meaning sixth, though not necessarily denoting a sixth child.… …   Wikipedia

  • Sixtus II. — am Hochaltar der Kirche von Altenfelden (Oberösterreich) Sixtus II. († 6. August 258) (Xystus) war Papst von Rom vom 30. August 257 bis zum 6. August 258. Sein Name bedeutet: S(e)xtus = der Sechste (lateinisch) bzw. (hier wahrscheinlicher) Xystus …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Sixtus IV —     Pope Sixtus IV     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► Pope Sixtus IV     (FRANCESCO DELLA ROVERE)     Born near Abisola, 21 July, 1414; died 12 Aug., 1484. His parents were poor, and while still a child he was destined for the Franciscan order. Later… …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Sixtus of Siena — or Sixtus Senensis (1520 1569), a converted Jew, followed a Franciscan course of study and became a Roman Catholic theologian. Though he was convicted of heresy he was saved by a Dominican inquisitor, the future Pope Pius V, who repealed the… …   Wikipedia

  • Sixtus III. — Sixtus III. (Xystus) (* im 4. Jahrhundert oder 5. Jahrhundert; † 18. oder 19. August 440) war Bischof von Rom (31. Juli 432–440). Sein Name bedeutet: Sixtus = der Sechste (latein.) bzw. Xystus = der Geglättete (griech.) Sein Name wird oft mit der …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Sixtus Lanner — (* 12. Mai 1934 in der Wildschönau, Tirol) ist ein österreichischer Politiker und früherer Direktor des Bauernbundes. Von 1976 bis 1982 war er Generalsekretär der ÖVP. Leben Bis zu seinem 20. Lebensjahr war Sixtus Lanner Landarbeiter in… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Sixtus von Tannberg — († 14. Juli 1495 in Frankenthal) war von 1470 bis 1474 Bischof von Gurk und von 1474 bis 1495 Fürstbischof von Freising. Leben Sixtus von Tannberg war ein Sohn von Johann Tannberg zu Aurolzmünster und der Ursula von Rohr, einer Schwester des… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Sixtus I. — Sixtus I. († um 125) (lat. griechisch Xystus) war etwa von 115 bis zu seinem Tode Bischof von Rom und wird als Priester und Märtyrer bezeichnet. Biografische Daten sind nicht überliefert. Er gilt als Römer und wird erstmals in der Papstliste des… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”