Baptismal Vows


Baptismal Vows
Baptismal Vows
The name popularly given to the renunciations required of an adult candidate for baptism just before the sacrament is conferred

Catholic Encyclopedia. . 2006.

Baptismal Vows
    Baptismal Vows
     Catholic_Encyclopedia Baptismal Vows
    The name popularly given to the renunciations required of an adult candidate for baptism just before the sacrament is conferred. In the case of infant baptism, they are made in the name of the child by the sponsors. It is obvious that these promises have not the theological import of vows properly so called. According to the Roman Ritual, at present in use, three questions are to be addressed to the person to be baptized, as follows: "Dost thou renounce Satan? and all his works? and all his pomps?" To each of these interrogation the person, or the sponsor in his name, replies: "I do renounce". The practice of demanding and making this formal renunciation seems to go back to the very beginnings of organized Christian worship. Tertullian among the Latins and St. Basil among the Greeks are at one in reckoning it as a usage which, although not explicitly warranted in the Scriptures, is nevertheless consecrated by a venerable tradition. St. Basil says this tradition ascends from the Apostles. Tertullian, in his "De Coronâ", appears to hint at a twofold renunciation as common in his time, one which was made at the moment of baptism and another made sometime before, and publicly in the church, in the presence of the bishop. The form of this renunciation a found in the Apostolic Constitutions (VIII, 4) has a quaint interest. It is as follows: "Let therefore the candidate for baptism declare thus in his renunciation: 'I renounce Satan and his works and his pomps and his worship and his Angels and his inventions and all things that are under him'. And after his renunciation let him in his consociation say: 'And I associate myself to Christ and believe and am baptized into one unbegotten being'", etc.
    Where there was a baptistery the renunciations were made in the proaulion oikon, the vestibule or ante-room, as distinguished from the esoteron oikon, the inner room where the baptism itself was administered. The catechumen, standing with his face to the West, which symbolized the abode of darkness, and stretching out his hand, or sometimes spitting out in defiance and abhorrence of the devil, was wont to make this abjuration. It was also customary after this for the candidate for baptism to make an explicit promise of obedience to Christ. This was called by the Greeks syntassesthai Christo, the giving of oneself over to the control of Christ. St. Justin Martyr testifies that baptism was only administered by those who, together with their profession of faith, made a promise or vow that they would live in conformity with the Christian code. Hence the generally employed formula: syntassomai soi, Christe, "I surrender myself to thee, O Christ, to be ruled by thy precepts". This took place directly over the apotaxis or renunciation of the devil, and was variously described by the Latins as promissum, pactum, and votum. During this declaration of attachment to Jesus Christ the person to be baptized turned towards the East as towards the region of light.
    The practice of renewing the baptismal promises is more or less widespread. This is done under circumstances of special solemnity such as at the closing exercises of a mission, after the administration of First Communion to children, or the conferring of the Sacrament of Confirmation. It is thus intended as a way of reaffirming one's loyalty to the obligations taken over by membership in the Christian Church.
    JOSEPH F. DELANY
    Transcribed by Janet Grayson

The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VIII. — New York: Robert Appleton Company. . 1910.


Catholic encyclopedia.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • baptismal vows — The promises made at baptism by the person baptized, or by their sponsors or parents • • • Main Entry: ↑vow …   Useful english dictionary

  • Baptismal vows — Baptismal VowsThe name popularly given to the renunciations required of an adult candidate for baptism just before the sacrament is conferred. In the case of infant baptism, they are made in the name of the child by the sponsors. It is obvious… …   Wikipedia

  • baptismal vows —  Крещальные обеты …   Вестминстерский словарь теологических терминов

  • Baptismal — Bap*tis mal, a. [Cf. F. baptismal.] Pertaining to baptism; as, baptismal vows. [1913 Webster] {Baptismal name}, the Christian name, which is given at baptism. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Baptismal name — Baptismal Bap*tis mal, a. [Cf. F. baptismal.] Pertaining to baptism; as, baptismal vows. [1913 Webster] {Baptismal name}, the Christian name, which is given at baptism. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Adventist baptismal vow — The Seventh day Adventist baptismal vow is a list of 13 belief statements which a person joining the Seventh day Adventist Church is expected to agree to. In Adventist understanding baptism, which is a public display of faith in Christ, is… …   Wikipedia

  • Old Saxon Baptismal Vow — The single manuscript. The Old Saxon Baptismal Vow is a 9th century Old Saxon baptismal vow found in Vatican Codex pal. 577. The vow mentions three Old Saxon gods; Uuôden ( Woden ), Thunear, and Saxnōt, which the reader is to forsake. One of many …   Wikipedia

  • Confirmation — For other uses, see Confirmation (disambiguation). A bishop administering Confirmation. Rogier van der Weyden, The Seven Sacraments, 15th century. Confirmation is a rite of initiation in Christian churches, normally carried out through anointing… …   Wikipedia

  • Easter Vigil — The Easter Vigil, also called the Paschal Vigil or the Great Vigil of Easter, is a service held in many Christian churches as the first official celebration of the Resurrection of Jesus. Historically, it is during this service that people… …   Wikipedia

  • Infant baptism — Water is poured on the head of an infant held over the baptismal font of a Catholic church Infant baptism[1][2] is the practice of baptising infants or young children. In theologic …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.