Acacia
Acacia
The Biblical Acacia belongs to the genus Mimosa

Catholic Encyclopedia. . 2006.

Acacia
    Acacia
     Catholic_Encyclopedia Acacia
    (in Hebrew shíttah, plural shíttîm; Theod. pyxos; Vulgate, spina, thorn). The Hebrew shíttah is probably a contraction of Shinttah, and thus identical with the Egyptian shent; the Coptic shonte, thorn; the Arabic sunt. Hence the Greek name akantha, thorn, the Latin, acanthus for the Egyptian acacia. Acacia wood is designated, "incorruptible wood", in the Septuagint, and lignum setim, "setim-wood" in the Vulgate. The Biblical Acacia belongs to the genus Mimosa, and is no doubt identical with the Acacia seyal (Del.) or the Acacia tortilis (Hayne); both are called seyyal, or torrent trees, sayl meaning torrent. They grow in the desert wadis, or torrent valleys, of Sinai. The wood is light, hard, and durable, and grows almost as black as ebony with age. The ark of the covenant, the table of the loaves of proposition, the altar of holocausts, the altar of incense, the wooden parts of the tabernacle, were made of setim-wood (Ex. xxv, 5). (See PLANTS OF THE BIBLE.)
    VIGOUROUX, in Dict. de la Bible (Paris, 1895); CHAPMAN in HASTINGS, Dictionary of the Bible, art. Shittah Tree (New York, 1902).
    A.J. MAAS

The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VIII. — New York: Robert Appleton Company. . 1910.


Catholic encyclopedia.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Acacia — Pour les articles homonymes, voir Acacia (homonymie) …   Wikipédia en Français

  • acacia — [ akasja ] n. m. • 1553; acacie XIVe; lat. acacia, du gr. 1 ♦ Bot. Arbre à feuilles divisées en folioles, à fleurs jaunes, dont certaines espèces produisent la gomme arabique. Le mimosa est un acacia (cf. Bois d amourette). 2 ♦ Cour. Arbre à… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • acacia — ACÁCIA, acacii, s.f. Nume dat arborilor sau arbuştilor tropicali din familia leguminoaselor, cu flori albe sau galbene, cultivaţi ca plante ornamentale, pentru industria parfumurilor şi pentru extragerea gumei arabice (Acacia). – Din lat., fr.… …   Dicționar Român

  • ACACIA — (Heb. שִׁטָּה, shittah), a tree of Israel considered to be identical to the shittah tree. In the past it was extensively used for construction. Today it is planted to beautify the arid regions of Israel. Acacia wood is mentioned repeatedly (Ex.… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • acacia — (Del lat. acacĭa, y este del gr. ἀκακία). 1. f. Árbol o arbusto de la familia de las Mimosáceas, a veces con espinas, de madera bastante dura, hojas compuestas o divididas en hojuelas, flores olorosas en racimos laxos y colgantes, y fruto en… …   Diccionario de la lengua española

  • acacia — familia de árboles y arbustos leguminosos. De algunos de ellos se extráen productos medicinales como el catecú de la Acacia catechu o la goma arábiga de la Acacia verek dibujo de herbario [véase http://www.iqb.es/diccio/a/ac1.htm#acacia]… …   Diccionario médico

  • acacia — [ə kā′shə] n. [ME < OFr acacie < L acacia < Gr akakia, shittah tree, thorny tree; prob. < akē, a point, thorn < IE base * ak̑ : see ACID] 1. a) any of several trees, shrubs, or other plants (genus Acacia) of the mimosa family, with …   English World dictionary

  • Acacia — A*ca cia, n.; pl. E. {Acacias}, L. {Acaci[ae]}. [L. from Gr. ?; orig. the name of a thorny tree found in Egypt; prob. fr. the root ak to be sharp. See {Acute}.] 1. A genus of leguminous trees and shrubs. Nearly 300 species are Australian or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • acacia — sustantivo femenino 1. Árbol o arbusto de varias especies, a veces con espinas, de hoja caduca y flores olorosas, dispuestas en racimos colgantes, del que se obtiene la goma arábiga. acacia blanca / falsa. acacia bastarda Endrino …   Diccionario Salamanca de la Lengua Española

  • acacia — (n.) 1540s, from L. acacia, from Gk. akakia thorny Egyptian tree, perhaps related to Gk. ake point, thorn, from PIE root *ak sharp (see ACRID (Cf. acrid)). Or perhaps a Hellenization of some Egyptian word. From late 14c. in English as the name of …   Etymology dictionary

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