Non-Jurors
Non-Jurors
Anglican Churchmen who in 1689 refused to take the oath of allegiance to William and Mary

Catholic Encyclopedia. . 2006.

Non-Jurors
    Non-Jurors
     Catholic_Encyclopedia Non-Jurors
    The name given to the Anglican Churchmen who in 1689 refused to take the oath of allegiance to William and Mary, and their successors under the Protestant Succession Act of that year. Their leaders on the episcopal bench (William Sancroft, Archbishop of Canterbury, and Bishops Francis Turner of Ely, William Lloyd of Norwich, Thomas White of Peterborough, William Thomas of Worcester, Thomas Ken of Bath and Wells, John Lake of Chichester, and Thomas Cartwright of Chester) were required to take the oath before 1 August, under pain of suspension, to be followed, if it were not taken by 1 February, by total deprivation. Two of them died before this last date, but the rest, persisting in their refusal, were deprived. Their example was followed by a multitude of the clergy and laity, the number of the former being estimated at about four hundred, conspicuous among whom were George Hickes, Dean of Worcester, Jeremy Collier, John Kettlewell, and Robert Nelson. A list of these Non-jurors is given in Hickes's "Memoirs of Bishop Kettlewell", and one further completed in Overton's "Non-jurors". The original Non-jurors were not friendly towards James II; indeed five of these bishops had been among the seven whose resistance to his Declaration of Indulgence earlier in the same year had contributed to the invitation which caused the Prince of Orange to come over. But desiring William and Mary as regents they distinguished between this and accepting them as sovereigns, regarding the latter as inconsistent with the oath taken to James. Deprived of their benefices the bishops fell into great poverty, and suffered occasional though not systematic persecution. That they were truly conscientious men is attested by sacrifices courageously made for their convictions. Their lives were edifying, some consenting to attend, as laymen, the services in the parish churches. Still, when circumstances permitted, they held secret services of their own, for they truly believed that they had the true Anglican succession which it was their duty to preserve. Hence they felt, after some hesitation, that it was incumbent on them to consecrate others who should succeed them. The first who were thus consecrated, on 24 February, 1693, were George Hickes and John Wagstaffe. On 29 May, 1713, the other Non-juring bishops being all dead, Hickes consecrated Jeremy Collier, Samuel Hawes, and Nathaniel Spinkes. When James II died in 1701, a crisis arose for these separatists. Some of them then rejoined the main body of their co-religionists, whilst others held out on the ground that their oath had been both to James and to his rightful heirs. These latter afterwards disagreed among themselves over a question of rites. The death of Charles Edward in 1788 took away the raison d'etre for the schism, but a few lingered on till the end of the eighteenth century. In Scotland in 1689 the whole body of Bishops refused the oath and became Non-jurors, but the resulting situation was somewhat different. As soon as the Revolution broke out the Presbyterians ousted the Episcopalians and became the Established Kirk of Scotland. Thus the Non-jurors were left without rivals of their own communion, though they had at times to suffer penalties for celebrating their unlawful worship. Their difficulties terminated in 1788, when on the death of Charles Edward they saw no further reason for withholding the oath to George III.
    SYDNEY F. SMITH
    Transcribed by Fr. Richard R. Losch

The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VIII. — New York: Robert Appleton Company. . 1910.


Catholic encyclopedia.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Non-jurors — (engl., spr. dschürers, »Nichtschwörer«), Bezeichnung der Jakobiten (s. d. 2) in England, die den nach Vertreibung Jakobs II. zur Herrschaft gelangten Königen den Untertaneneid verweigerten. Vgl. Overton, The Nonjurors (Lond. 1902) …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Non-Jurors —    Members of the Church of England who refused to take the Oath of Allegiance to King William and Queen Mary after the revolution against King James II in 1688 …   Who’s Who in Christianity

  • non-jurors — In English law, persons who refuse to take the oaths, required by law, to support the government. Originally those who refused to swear allegiance to the successors on the throne of the falsely deposed Stuarts …   Black's law dictionary

  • non-jurors — In English law, persons who refuse to take the oaths, required by law, to support the government. Originally those who refused to swear allegiance to the successors on the throne of the falsely deposed Stuarts …   Black's law dictionary

  • Non-juror — A non juror is a person who refuses to swear a particular oath. In British history, non jurors refused to swear allegiance to William and Mary; see Nonjuring schism In French history, non jurors were clergy members who refused to swear an oath of …   Wikipedia

  • Non-Juror — Als Non Juror (dt. Nicht Schwörer) werden die Anhänger einer strengen Auslegung der anglikanischen Kirchen und Staatsvorstellung im Gefolge der Glorious Revolution 1688/89 in England bezeichnet. Etwa 400 Geistliche und einige Tausend Laien… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Non-economic damages caps — are controversial tort reforms to limit (i.e., cap ) damages for intangible harms such as severe pain, physical and emotional distress, disfigurement, loss of the enjoyment of life that an injury has caused, including sterility, physical… …   Wikipedia

  • ad quaestionem juris non respondent juratores — Jurors do not pass upon questions of law. State v Barbee, 65 Vt 1, 25 A 964 …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • quemadmodum ad quaestionem facti non respondent judices, ita ad quaestionem juris non respondent juratores — /kwemaedmadam aed kwest(i)yownsm faektay non raspondant juwdasiyz, ayta aed kwest(i)yownam jiiras non raspondant juratoriyz/ In the same manner that judges do not answer to questions of fact, so jurors do not answer to questions of law …   Black's law dictionary

  • ad quaestiones legis judices, et non juratores, respondent — /aed kwes(h)chiy6wniyz liyjas juwdasiyz, et non juratoriyz, raspondant/ Judges, and not jurors, decide questions of law …   Black's law dictionary

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