Nikolaus von Dinkelsbühl
Nikolaus von Dinkelsbühl
German theologian (1360-1433)

Catholic Encyclopedia. . 2006.

Nikolaus von Dinkelsbuhl
    Nikolaus von Dinkelsbühl
     Catholic_Encyclopedia Nikolaus von Dinkelsbühl
    Theologian, b c. 1360, at Dinkelsbühl; d. 17 March, 1433, at Mariazell in Styria. He studied at the University of Vienna where he is mentioned as baccalaureus in the faculty of Arts in 1385. Magister in 1390, he lectured in philosophy, mathematics, and physics until 1397, and from 1402 to 1405. From 1397 he was dean of the faculty; he studied theology, lecturing until 1402 on theological subjects, first as cursor biblicus, and later on the "Sentences" of Peter Lombard. In 1405 he became bachelor of Divinity, in 1408 licentiate, and in 1409 doctor and member of the theological faculty. Rector of the university, 1405-6, he declined the honor of a re-election in 1409. From 1405 he was also canon at the cathedral of St. Stephen. The supposition of several early authors that he was a member of the Order of the Hermits of St. Augustine is incorrect, for he could not have been rector of the university had he been a member of any order. Eminent as teacher and pulpit orator, Nikolaus possessed great business acumen, and was frequently chosen as ambassador both by the university and the reigning prince. He represented Duke Albert V of Austria at the Council of Constance (1414-18), and the University of Vienna in the trial of Thiem, dean of the Passau cathedral. When Emperor Sigismund came to Constance, Nikolaus delivered an address on the abolition of the schism ("Sermo de unione Ecclesiae in Concilium Constantiense," II, 7, Frankfort, 1697, 182-7). He took part in the election of Martin V, and delivered an address to the new pope (Sommerfeldt, "Historisches Jahrbuch", XXVI, 1905, 323-7). Together with John, Patriarch of Constantinople, he was charged with the examination of witnesses in the proceedings against Hieronymus of Prague. Returning to Vienna in 1418, he again took up his duties as teacher at the university, and in 1423 directed the theological promotions as representative of the chancellor. Duke Albert V having chosen him as his confessor in 1425, wished to make him Bishop of Passau, but Nikolaus declined the appointment. During the preparations for the Council of Basle, he was one of the committee to draw up the reform proposals which were to be presented to the council. His name does not appear thereafter in the records of the university.
    His published works include "Postilla cum sermonibus evangeliorum dominicalium" (Strasburg, 1496), and a collection of "Sermones" with tracts (Strasburg, 1516). Among his numerous unpublished works, the manuscripts of which are chiefly kept in the Court library at Vienna and in the Court and State library at Munich, are to be mentioned his commentaries on the Psalms, Isaias, the Gospel of St. Matthew, some of the Epistles of St. Paul, the "Sentences" of Peter Lombard, and "Questiones Sententiarum"; a commentary on the "Physics" of Aristotle, numerous sermons, lectures, moral and ascetic tracts.
    ASCHBACH, Gesch der Wiener Universitat, I (Vienna, 1865), 430-40; STANONIK in Allg. deut. Biog., XXIII (1886), 622 sq.; ESSER in Kirchenlex., s. v. Nicolaus von Dinkelsbühl; HURTER, Nomen., II (Innsbruck, 1906 ), 830-32.
    FRIEDRICH LAUCHERT
    Transcribed by Joseph E. O'Connor

The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VIII. — New York: Robert Appleton Company. . 1910.


Catholic encyclopedia.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Nikolaus von Dinkelsbühl — Nikolaus von Dinkelsbühl, eigentl. Nicolaus Prunczlein, (* um 1360 in Dinkelsbühl; † 17. März 1433 in Wien) war ein deutscher Theologe. Inhaltsverzeichnis 1 Leben 2 Werke 3 Einige Schüler von Nikolaus von Dinkelsbühl …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Nikolaus von Dinkelsbühl — was an Austrian Roman Catholic clergyman, pulpit orator and theologian. Biography He was born c. 1360, at Dinkelsbühl. He studied at the University of Vienna where he is mentioned as baccalaureus in the faculty of Arts in 1385. Magister in 1390,… …   Wikipedia

  • Johannes von Dinkelsbühl — (* 1370[1]; † 1465; eigentlich Johannes Widemann) stammte aus Dinkelsbühl und war Professor und Rektor an der Universität Wien. Er war Schüler des Nikolaus von Dinkelsbühl, zählte zur Wiener Schule der Pastoraltheologie und war berühmt für seinen …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Nikolaus (Päpste) — Nikolaus ist ein männlicher Vorname. Der erste im Neuen Testament genannte Nikolaus war einer der Sieben Diakone, die die Mitglieder der Jerusalemer Urgemeinde auf Anregung der Apostel zu deren Unterstützung auswählten (Apg 6,5 EU). Der mit… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Nikolaus II — Nikolaus ist ein männlicher Vorname. Der erste im Neuen Testament genannte Nikolaus war einer der Sieben Diakone, die die Mitglieder der Jerusalemer Urgemeinde auf Anregung der Apostel zu deren Unterstützung auswählten (Apg 6,5 EU). Der mit… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Nikolaus — von Myra (Russische Ikone von Aleksa Petrov, 1294) Nikolaus ist ein männlicher Vorname und Familienname. Die weibliche Entsprechung ist Nicole oder Nicola. Zur Rolle des heiligen Nikolaus am Nikolaustag oder als Weihnachtsmann: → Hauptartikel:… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Dinkelsbühl (Begriffsklärung) — Dinkelsbühl bezeichnet: Dinkelsbühl, Stadt in Bayern Landkreis Dinkelsbühl, ein Landkreis in Bayern bis 1972, danach im Landkreis Ansbach aufgegangen Nikolaus von Dinkelsbühl, ein deutscher Theologe Johannes von Dinkelsbühl, ein deutscher… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Dinkelsbühl — Wappen Deutschlandkarte …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Nikolaus Eseler der Ältere — (* 1410 in Alzey; † 1483 in Frankfurt am Main) ist ein spätgotischer Baumeister aus dem süddeutschen Raum. Er wurde 1410 als Sohn des späteren Mainzer Dombaumeisters Peter Eseler geboren. Er starb 1483 in Frankfurt am Main. Die St. Georgs Kirche… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Nikolaus Eseler der Jüngere — Nikolaus Eseler d. Jüngere war wie sein Vater, Nikolaus Eseler der Ältere, ein süddeutscher Baumeister der Spätgotik. Er führte die von seinem Vater begonnenen Bauten in Rothenburg und Nördlingen weiter. Die spätgotische Hallenkirche St. Georg in …   Deutsch Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”