Glebe
Glebe
Originally signified, in common law, any farm, estate, or parcel of land, and the word is so used in the Theodosian Code. But in ecclesiastical law it has become the technical term for land permanently assigned for the maintenance of the incumbent of a parish, and is the oldest form of parochial endowment

Catholic Encyclopedia. . 2006.

Glebe
    Glebe
     Catholic_Encyclopedia Glebe
    Glebe (Lat. gleba) originally signified, in common law, any farm, estate, or parcel of land, and the word is so used in the Theodosian Code. But in ecclesiastical law it has become the technical term for land permanently assigned for the maintenance of the incumbent of a parish, and is the oldest form of parochial endowment. This use of the word is found in numerous medieval charters, of which Du Cange gives a few examples, and formerly no church could be consecrated unless thus endowed with a house and glebe. The fee-simple was held to be in abeyance, that is, without an owner in the eyes of the law, but the freehold belonged to the incumbent. It could be leased, sold, or exchanged, with the bishop's consent, and was sometimes allowed to be mortgaged for the purpose of repairing the parsonage or church. In England and Scotland, where glebe is held by the established Churches of those countries, there are now special laws regarding the leasing, sale, or exchange of such property, and all such transactions are subject to the approval of the land commissioners. In the Catholic Church, glebe, where it exists, is regarded as mensal property, and canon law regulates the conditions which govern its possession. The alienation of mensal property is now held by most legists to require the special permission of the pope, and even then only certain justifying causes are recognized, viz:
    (1) necessity, as when a church is overburdened with debt;
    (2) utility, or the opening for an advantageous exchange;
    (3) to redeem captives or feed the poor in time of famine;
    (4) convenience, as when the land is so situated that its produce cannot be gathered without great expense. Certain specified formalities have also to be complied with. (See PROPERTY, ECCLESIASTICAL.)
    BOUIX, De parocho (Paris, 1852); FERRARS, Bibl. prompt. (Rome, 1886-95); SMITH, Elements of Eccl. Law (New York, 1877-89). For the English law see PHILLIMORE, Ecclesiastical Law (London, 1905). See also bibliography under PROPERTY, ECCLESIASTICAL.
    G. CYPRIAN ALSTON
    Transcribed by WGKofron With thanks to Fr. John Hilkert, Akron, Ohio

The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VIII. — New York: Robert Appleton Company. . 1910.


Catholic encyclopedia.

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  • glèbe — glèbe …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • glèbe — [ glɛb ] n. f. • XVe; lat. gleba 1 ♦ Vx Motte de terre. Écraser les glèbes. 2 ♦ Littér. Champ, sol cultivé. Le « paysan qui ne veut pas se départir de sa glèbe » (Sand). ♢ Féod. Fonds de terre auquel les serfs étaient attachés et qu ils devaient… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • glebe — GLEBE. Motte de terre. Il ne se dit qu en termes de Pratique & de Coutume, & signifie, Un heritage. Nul fief sans glebe. les hommes de main morte sont attachez à la glebe. le patronage suit la glebe …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • Glebe — Glebe, n. [F. gl[ e]be, L. gleba, glaeba, clod, land, soil.] 1. A lump; a clod. [1913 Webster] 2. Turf; soil; ground; sod. [1913 Webster] Fertile of corn the glebe, of oil, and wine. Milton. [1913 Webster] 3. (Eccl. Law) The land belonging, or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • glébé — glébé, ée (entrée créée par le supplément) (glé bé, bée) adj. Ancien terme de droit féodal. Qui appartient à la glèbe. •   Pour invoquer cet usage [l usage féodal de prendre les titres de dignité attachés aux terres qu on possédait], il faudrait… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • glèbe — (la): S apitoyer sur la glèbe …   Dictionnaire des idées reçues

  • glebe — c.1300, from O.Fr. glebe, from L. gleba, glaeba clod, lump of earth, from PIE *glebh to roll into a ball (Cf. L. globus sphere; O.E. clyppan to embrace; Lith. glebys armful, globti to embrace, support ). Earliest English sense is …   Etymology dictionary

  • glebe — [glēb] n. [ME < L gleba, clod, lump of earth (in ML(Ec), glebe), akin to globus: see GLOBE] 1. a piece of church land forming part or all of a benefice 2. Archaic soil; earth; esp., a piece of cultivated land …   English World dictionary

  • glebe — land belonging to the Church. Collins dictionary of law. W. J. Stewart. 2001 …   Law dictionary

  • glebe — [ glib ] noun count LITERARY a piece of land belonging to the Church …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

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