Diocletian
Diocletian
Roman Emperor and persecutor of the Church, b. of parents who had been slaves, at Dioclea, near Salona, in Dalmatia, A.D. 245; d. at Salona, A.D. 313

Catholic Encyclopedia. . 2006.

Diocletian
    Diocletian
     Catholic_Encyclopedia Diocletian
    (VALERIUS DIOCLETIANUS).
    Roman Emperor and persecutor of the Church, b. of parents who had been slaves, at Dioclea, near Salona, in Dalmatia, A.D. 245; d. at Salona, A.D. 313.
    He entered the army and by his marked abilities attained the offices of Governor of Mœsia, consul, and commander of the guards of the palace. In the Persian war, under Carus, he especially distinguished himself. When the son and successor of Carus, Numerian, was murdered at Chalcedon, the choice of the army fell upon Diocletian, who immediately slew with his own hand the murderer Aper (17 Sept., 284). His career as emperor belongs to secular history. Here only a summary will be given. The reign of Diocletian (284-305) marked an era both in the military and political history of the empire. The triumph which he celebrated together with his colleague Maximian (20 Nov., 303) was the last triumph which Rome ever beheld. Britain, the Rhine, the Danube, and the Nile furnished trophies; but the proudest boast of the conqueror was that Persia, the persistent enemy of Rome, had at last been subdued. Soon after his accession to power Diocletian realized that the empire was too unwieldy and too much exposed to attack to be safely ruled by a single head. Accordingly, he associated with himself Maximian, a bold but rude soldier, at first as Cæsar and afterwards as Augustus (286). Later on, he further distributed his power by granting the inferior title of Cæsar to two generals, Galerius and Constantius (292). He reserved for his own portion Thrace, Egypt, and Asia; Italy and Africa were Maximian's provinces, while Galerius was stationed on the Danube, and Constantius had charge of Gaul, Spain, and Britain. But the supreme control remained in Diocletian's hands. None of the rulers resided in Rome, and thus the way was prepared for the downfall of the imperial city. Moreover, Diocletian undermined the authority of the Senate, assumed the diadem, and introduced the servile ceremonial of the Persian court. After a prosperious reign of nearly twenty-one years, he abdicated the throne and retired to Salona, where he lived in magnificent seclusion until his death.
    Diocletian's name is associated with the last and most terrible of all the ten persecutions of the early Church. Nevertheless it is a fact that the Christians enjoyed peace and prosperity during the greater portion of his reign. Eusebius, who lived at this time, describes in glowing terms "the glory and the liberty with which the doctrine of piety was honoured", and he extols the clemency of the emperors towards the Christian governors whom they appointed, and towards the Christian members of their households. He tells us that the rulers of the Church "were courted and honoured with the greatest subserviency by all the rulers and governors". He speaks of the vast multitudes that flocked to the religion of Christ, and of the spacious and splendid churches erected in the place of the humbler buildings of earlier days. At the same time he bewails the falling from ancient fervour "by reason of exccessive liberty" (Hist. Eccl., VIII, i). Had Diocletian remained sole emperor, he would probably have allowed this toleration to continue undisturbed. It was his subordinate Galerius who first induced him to turn persecutor. These two rulers of the East, at a council held at Nicomedia in 302, resolved to suppress Christianity throughout the empire. The cathedral of Nicomedia was demolished (24 Feb., 303). An edict was issued "to tear down the churches to the foundations and to destroy the Sacred Scriptures by fire; and commanding also that those who were in honourable stations should be degraded if they persevered in their adherence to Christianity" (Euseb., op. cit., VIII, ii). Three further edicts (303-304) marked successive stages in the severity of the persecution: the first ordering that the bishops, presbyters, and deacons ( see Deacons ) should be imprisoned; the second that they should be tortured and compelled by every means to sacrifice; the third including the laity as well as the clergy. The atrocious cruelty with which these edicts were enforced, and the vast numbers of those who suffered for the Faith are attested by Eusebius and the Acts of the Martyrs. We read even of the massacre of the whole population of a town because they declared themselves Christians (Euseb., loc. cit., xi, xii; Lactant., "Div. Instit.", V, xi). The abdication of Diocletian (1 May, 305) and the subsequent partition of the empire brought relief to many provinces. In the East, however, where Galerius and Maximian held sway, the persecution continued to rage. Thus it will be seen that the so-called Diocletian persecution should be attributed to the influence of Galerius; it continued for seven years after Diocletian's abdication. (See PERSECUTIONS.)
    EUSEBIUS, Hist. Eccl. in P.G., XX; De Mart. Palæstinæ, P.G., XX, 1457-1520; LACTANTIUS, Divinæ Institutiones, V, in P.L., VI; De Mortibus Persecutorum, P.L., VII; GIBBON, Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, xiii, xvi; ALLARD, Le persécution de Dioclétien et le triomphe de l'eglise (Paris, 1890); IDEM, Le christianisme et l'empire romain (Paris, 1898); IDEM, Ten Lectures on the Martyrs, tr. (London, 1907); DUCHESNE, Histoire ancienne de l'eglise (Paris, 1907), II.
    T.B. SCANNELL
    Transcribed by WGKofron With thanks to St. Mary's Church, Akron, Ohio

The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VIII. — New York: Robert Appleton Company. . 1910.


Catholic encyclopedia.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Diocletian — 51st Emperor of the Roman Empire Laureate bust of Diocletian. Reign 20 November 284 – 1 April 286 (alone) 1 April 286 – …   Wikipedia

  • Diocletian — [dī΄ə klē′shən] (L. name Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus) A.D. 245 313; Rom. emperor (284 305) …   English World dictionary

  • Diocletian — /duy euh klee sheuhn/, n. (Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus) A.D. 245 316, Illyrian soldier: emperor of Rome 284 305. * * * Latin Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus orig. Diocles born AD 245, Salonae?, Dalmatia died 316, Salonae Roman… …   Universalium

  • Diocletian — Roman Emperor AD 284 305.     Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus was commander of the Imperial Guard and became emperor when Numerian (AD 283 4) was assassinated. He was the last reigning Roman emperor to visit Egypt: he was present at the fall …   Ancient Egypt

  • Diocletian — Büste Diokletians im Archäologischen Museum Istanbul Diokletian (* zwischen 236 und 245 in Dalmatien; † 3. Dezember 313 oder 316 in Spalatum), vollständiger Name Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus, war von 284 bis 305 römischer Kaiser.… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Diocletian —    Emperor (q.v.) from 284 305 whose reign is associated with certain important administrative and other reforms. Provincial governors were stripped of their military authority and provinces (q.v.) became smaller by increasing their number from… …   Historical dictionary of Byzantium

  • Diocletian — noun Roman Emperor who when faced with military problems decided in 286 to divide the Roman Empire between himself in the east and Maximian in the west; he initiated the last persecution of the Christians in 303 (245 313) • Syn: ↑Gaius Aurelius… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Diocletian — biographical name 245 316 Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus Roman emperor (284 305) …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Diocletian — noun /ˌdaɪ.ɵˈkliːʃən/lang=en Roman cognomen, particularly borne by the Roman emperor (245 313) …   Wiktionary

  • DIOCLETIAN —    Roman emperor from 284 to 308, born at Salona, in Dalmatia, of obscure parentage; having entered the Roman army, served with distinction, rose rapidly to the highest rank, and was at Chalcedon, after the death of Numerianus, invested by the… …   The Nuttall Encyclopaedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”