Derogation
Derogation
The partial revocation of a law, as opposed to abrogation or the total abolition of a law

Catholic Encyclopedia. . 2006.

Derogation
    Derogation
     Catholic_Encyclopedia Derogation
    (Latin derogatio).
    The partial revocation of a law, as opposed to abrogation or the total abolition of a law. This definition of derogation first introduced by the Roman jurisconsult Modestinus (XVI, 102, De verb. significatione) was soon adopted in the canonical legislation. Even yet, however, derogation in a loose sense means also abrogation, hence the common saying: Lex posterior derogat priori, i.e. a subsequent law imports the abolition of a previous one. Dispensation differs from derogation principally in the fact that the latter affects the law itself which is thereby partially revoked, while the former affects the persons bound by the law, from whose obligation some of them are in particular cases totally or partially released. Derogation is often accomplished by special clauses inserted in papal documents, e.g. Non obstantibus etc. (see RESCRIPTS). The absence of such derogatory clauses as are always employed in papal rescripts makes them defective in form. The following rules are helpful for the interpretation of derogations:
    ♦ Apart from special cases, derogations are to be strictly interpreted, any correction of the law being regularly of an odious nature.
    ♦ A simple derogation, that imposes no obligation contrary to that of the existing law, does not require a formal promulgation.
    ♦ No clause expressly derogatory of the existing law is requisite in making derogations from any kind of general ecclesiastical laws; exception is made only when it is proposed to derogate from the rules of the Apostolic Chancery.
    ♦ Derogations couched in general terms are not upheld; they must be made in specific and formal terms.
    ♦ The rule of law that a special enactment is derogatory of the previous general one (Generi derogatur per speciem; Reg. 34 in VI) means that a particular law which is a derogation of a general one must always produce its derogatory effect, it being immaterial whether it was issued before the general law or after it. In the latter case the special law is maintained as it was intentionally made by the competent superior; nor in the former instance does it lose its value, because the superior had no intention of abolishing it by a subsequent general law, it being a presumption that superiors are not cognizant of particular laws or customs. (see CUSTOM; LAW).
    S. LUZIO
    Transcribed by Michael C. Tinkler

The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VIII. — New York: Robert Appleton Company. . 1910.


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  • dérogation — [ derɔgasjɔ̃ ] n. f. • 1408; lat. derogatio ♦ Le fait de déroger à une loi, à une convention, à une règle. ⇒ infraction, manquement, violation. « la dérogation aux lois d hérédité commise par la Révolution de Juillet » (Renan). Être admis par… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • derogation — der·o·ga·tion /ˌder ə gā shən/ n [Latin derogatio partial abrogation of a law, from derogare to detract from the force of (a law)]: a taking away or detraction from something (as the force of a law) the executive was without power to act in… …   Law dictionary

  • Derogation — is the partial revocation of a law, as opposed to abrogation or the total abolition of a law. The term is used in both civil law and common law. It is sometimes used, loosely, to mean abrogation, as in the legal maxim: Lex posterior derogat… …   Wikipedia

  • Derogation — Der o*ga tion, n. [L. derogatio: cf. F. d[ e]rogation.] 1. The act of derogating, partly repealing, or lessening in value; disparagement; detraction; depreciation; followed by of, from, or to. [1913 Webster] I hope it is no derogation to the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dérogation — DÉROGATION. sub. fém. Acte par lequel le Roi déroge à un Édit, à une Loi, etc. ou les particuliers à un Contrat, à un Testament qu ils ont fait. Cet Édit subsiste en entier, il n y a point eu de dérogation. Cette clause n emporte point de… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

  • derogation — Derogation. s.f. v. Acte par lequel le Roy deroge à un Edit, à une Loy, &c. ou les particuliers à un contract, à un testament, &c. Cet Edit subsiste tout entier, il n a point eu de derogation. cette clause n emporte point de derogation à une… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • derogation — [der΄ə gā′shən] n. 〚ME derogacioun < OFr derogation < L derogatio: see DEROGATE〛 1. a lessening or weakening (of power, authority, position, etc.) 2. disparagement; detraction 3. a lowering of oneself; loss of rank …   Universalium

  • derogation — UK US /ˌderəˈɡeɪʃən/ noun [C or U] FORMAL LAW ► special permission not to obey a rule, law, etc.: »It is possible to obtain derogation from certain Stock Exchange requirements but this must be applied for in the early stages of a transaction …   Financial and business terms

  • derogation — [der΄ə gā′shən] n. [ME derogacioun < OFr derogation < L derogatio: see DEROGATE] 1. a lessening or weakening (of power, authority, position, etc.) 2. disparagement; detraction 3. a lowering of oneself; loss of rank …   English World dictionary

  • Derogation — (lat.), die Aufhebung eines Gesetzes durch ein später erlassenes Gesetz; dann insbes. die Abänderung eines Gesetzes durch Aufhebung einzelner Bestimmungen im Gegensatze zur Abrogation, der vollen Aufhebung des ganzen Gesetzes; derogieren,… …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

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