Clerestory
Clerestory
A term formerly applied to any window or traceried opening in a church, e. g. in an aisle, tower, cloister, or screen, but now restricted to the windows in an aisled nave, or to the range of wall in which the high windows are set

Catholic Encyclopedia. . 2006.

Clerestory
    Clerestory
     Catholic_Encyclopedia Clerestory
    A term formerly applied to any window or traceried opening in a church, e. g. in an aisle, tower, cloister, or screen, but now restricted to the windows in an aisled nave, or to the range of wall in which the high windows are set. Sometimes these windows are very small, being mere quatrefoils or spherical triangles. In Large buildings, however, they are important features both of beauty and utility. The clerestory is especially used in churches where the division into nave and side aisles permits the introduction of light into the body of the church from above the aisle roofs. According to Fergusson's theory, the interior of Greek temples was lighted by a clerestory, similar internally to that found in the great Egyptian temples, but externally requiring such a change of arrangement as was necessary to adapt it to a sloping instead of a flat roof. This seems to have been effected by countersinking into the roof, so as to make three ridges in those parts where the light was admitted, though the regular shape of the roof was retained between these openings. Thus, neither the ridge nor the continuity of the lines of the roof was interfered with. This theory is borne out by all the remains of Greek temples that now exist, and by all the descriptions that have been handed down from antiquity. Simpson, however, regards the theory as extremely improbable.
    FLETCHER AND FLETCHER, A History of Architecture (London, New York, 1896), 690; GWILT, Encyc. of Arch. (London, 1881), 1648; PARKER, Glossary of Arch. (Oxford, 1850), I. 104; STURGIS, Dict. of Arch. and Building (London, 1904); FERGUSSON, A History of Architecture in all Countries (New York); SIMPSON, A history of Architectural Development (New York, 1905).
    THOMAS H. POOLE.
    Transcribed by Douglas J. Potter Dedicated to the Immaculate Heart of the Blessed Virgin Mary

The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VIII. — New York: Robert Appleton Company. . 1910.


Catholic encyclopedia.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Clerestory — Clere sto ry (kl[=e]r st[=o] r[y^]), n. Same as {Clearstory}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • clerestory — early 15c., probably from clere clear, in a sense light, lighted (see CLEAR (Cf. clear)), and STORY (Cf. story), though this sense of that word is not otherwise found so early. Originally the upper part of the nave, transepts, and choir of a… …   Etymology dictionary

  • clerestory — (US also clearstory) ► NOUN (pl. clerestories) ▪ the upper part of the nave, choir, and transepts of a large church, incorporating a series of windows which admit light to the central parts of the building. ORIGIN from CLEAR(Cf. ↑clearness) +… …   English terms dictionary

  • clerestory — [klir′stôr΄ē] n. pl. clerestories [ME clerestorie < cler, CLEAR + storie,STORY2] the upper part of a wall, specif. of a church, containing windows for lighting the central part of a lofty room or space …   English World dictionary

  • Clerestory — The church of St Nicolai, Stralsund. The clerestory is the level between the two green roofs. Clerestory (   …   Wikipedia

  • clerestory — clerestoried, adj. /klear stawr ee, stohr ee/, n., pl. clerestories. 1. Archit. a portion of an interior rising above adjacent rooftops and having windows admitting daylight to the interior. 2. a raised construction, as on the roof of a railroad… …   Universalium

  • clerestory — UK [ˈklɪə(r)ˌstɔːrɪ] / UK [ˈklɪə(r)stərɪ] / US [ˈklɪrˌstɔrɪ] noun [countable] Word forms clerestory : singular clerestory plural clerestories in architecture, the upper part of the wall of a church, where there is a series of windows …   English dictionary

  • Clerestory — Clearstory Clear sto ry (kl[=e]r st[=o] r[y^]), Clerestory Clere sto ry, n. (Arch.) The upper story of the nave of a church, containing windows, and rising above the aisle roofs. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Clerestory —    The term refers to the row of windows in the upper part of a wall. Clerestories were used by the ancient Romans in their basilicas, baths, and other such structures to bring light into the interior. The Early Christian masters borrowed the… …   Dictionary of Renaissance art

  • clerestory — also clearstory noun Etymology: Middle English, from clere clear + story Date: 15th century 1. an outside wall of a room or building that rises above an adjoining roof and contains windows 2. gallery …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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