Sts. Nazarius and Celsus
Sts. Nazarius and Celsus
    Sts. Nazarius and Celsus
     Catholic_Encyclopedia Sts. Nazarius and Celsus
    The only historical information which we possess regarding these two martyrs is the discovery of their bodies by St. Ambrose. Paulinus relates (Vita Ambrosii, xxxii-xxxiii) that Ambrose, at some time within the last three years of his life, after the death of the Emperor Theodosius (d. 395), discovered in a garden outside the walls of Milan the body of St. Nazarius, with severed head and still stained with blood, and that he caused it to be carried to the Basilica of the Apostles. In the same garden Ambrose likewise discovered the body of St. Celsus, which he caused to be transported to the same basilica. Obviously a tradition regarding these martyrs was extant in the Christian community of Milan which led to the finding of the two bodies. A later legend, without historical foundation, places the martyrdom of these witnesses to the faith during the persecution of Nero, and describes with many details the supposed journeyings of St. Nazarius through Gaul and Italy. He is also brought into relation with the two martyrs Gervasius and Protasius. Paulinus says distinctly (l.c.) that the date on which Nazarius suffered martyrdom is unknown. The discourse eulogizing the two saints, attributed to St. Ambrose (Sermo lv, in P.L., XVII, 715 sqq.), is not genuine. St. Paulinus of Nola speaks in praise of St. Nazarius in his Poema xxvii (P.L., LXI, 658). A magnificent silver reliquary with interesting figures, dating from the fourth century, was found in the church of San Nazaro in Milan (Venturi, "Storia dell' arte italiana", I, Milan, 1901, fig. 445-49). The feast of the two martyrs, with that of Sts. Victor and Innocent, is on 28 July.
    Mombritius, Sanctuarium, II, fol. 179 v-184 v; Acta SS., Julii, VI, 503-533; Analecta Bollandiana, II (1883), 302-307; Bibliotheca hagiographica latina, II, 881-882; Dufourcq, Etude sur les 'Gesta Martyrum' romains, II (Paris, 1907), 61 sqq.; Savio, in Ambrosiana (Milan, 1897); Puricelli, De ss. martyribus Nazario et Celso, ac Protasio et Gervasio, Mediolani sub Nerone coesis, deque basilicis in quibus eorum corpora quiescunt (Milan, 1656).
    J.P. KIRSCH
    Transcribed by Gary Rosys

The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VIII. — New York: Robert Appleton Company. . 1910.


Catholic encyclopedia.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Nazarius and Celsus — For other uses, see Nazarius (disambiguation). Saints Nazarius and Celsus Giovanni Antonio Merli, Saint Nazarius on a horse, 1480. St. Nazarius and Celsus Abbey, San Nazzaro Sesia. Marty …   Wikipedia

  • Ambrosian Liturgy and Rite — • The liturgy and Rite of the Church of Milan, which derives its name from St. Ambrose, Bishop of Milan (374 397) Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Ambrosian Liturgy and Rite     Ambrosian Liturgy and Rite …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Mediolanum — This article is about Roman Milan. For other uses, see Mediolanum (disambiguation). A section of Roman wall (11 m high) with a 24 sided tower. Mediolanum, the ancient Milan, was an important Celtic and then Roman centre of northern Italy. This… …   Wikipedia

  • Archdiocese of Milan —     Archdiocese of Milan     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► Archdiocese of Milan     (MEDIOLANENSIS)     Located in Lombardy, northern Italy. The city is situated on the Orona River, which, with three canals, the Naviglio Grande (1257 72), the… …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Diocese of Gap —     Gap     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► Gap     (VAPINCENSIS).     Diocese; suffragan of Aix, includes the department of the Hautes Alpes. Suppressed by the Concordat of 1801 and then united to Digne, this diocese was re established in 1822 and… …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Traditional Ambrosian Rite — This article is about the form of the Ambrosian Rite used before the Vatican II; for an explanation of the history and of the current form of this Rite, see Ambrosian Rite. Traditional Ambrosian Rite is the form of the Ambrosian Rite used before… …   Wikipedia

  • Milanese Apostolic Catholic Church — Contents 1 The City See of the Church 2 Christianity in Milan 2.1 Foundation of the Diocese 2.2 Beginning of Roman political control …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”