Gregor Aichinger
Gregor Aichinger
    Gregor Aichinger
     Catholic_Encyclopedia Gregor Aichinger
    Organist and composer of sacred music, born probably at Ratisbon in 1565; died at Augsburg, 21 January, 1628. He was a priest at least towards the end of his life. As early as 1590 he was the organist to the patrician Jacob Fugger at Augsburg. He paid a visit to Rome in 1599. His musical development was largely influenced by the Venetian school, and especially by Gabrieli. In 1601, or thereabouts, he returned to Augsburg and re-entered the service of the Fuggers. Of his numerous compositions we mention "Liturgica, sive Sacra Officia ad omnes dies festos Magnae Dei Matris", (Augsburg, 1603); "Sacrae Cantiones", for four, five, six, eight, and ten voices (Venice, 1590); "Tricinia Mariana" (Innsbruck, 1598); "Fasciculus Sacr. Harmoniarum" (Dillingen, 1606). The full list is found in Eitner's "Quellen-Lexikon." Proske thus characterizes Aichinger and his fellow-worker Hassler in the Fugger choir: "Though Hassler excelled in intellect and originality, both masters had this in common that they combined the solid features of German art with the refined froms of Italian genius, which flourished at that time especially in Rome and Venice, and had stamped their works with freer melody and more fluent harmony. Aichinger in particular distinguishes himself by a warmth and tenderness of feeling bordering on mellowness, which is everywhere imbued with deep devotion. Meanwhile he does not lack sublimity nor solemnity, indeed some of his longest compositions satisfy throughout the strictest demands of art."
    KORNMUELLER, Lex. der kirchl. Tonkunst; GROVE, Dict. of Music and Musicians; NAUMANN, Geschichte der Musik.
    J.A. VOELKER
    Transcribed by David Griffiths

The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VIII. — New York: Robert Appleton Company. . 1910.


Catholic encyclopedia.

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  • Gregor Aichinger — (1564 1628), fue un compositor alemán. Fue uno de los primeros alemanes en recibir educación musical italiana junto con Hans Leo Hassler, fue alumno de Andrea Gabrieli pero también recibió educación de Orlando di Lasso. La mayor parte de sus… …   Wikipedia Español

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  • Aichinger, Gregor — • Organist and composer of sacred music, born probably at Ratisbon in 1565; died at Augsburg, 21 January, 1628 Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006 …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Aichinger, Gregor — ▪ German composer born 1564, Regensburg, Bishopric of Ratisbon [now in Germany] died Jan. 21, 1628, Augsburg       German composer of religious music during the stylistic transition from the late Renaissance to early Baroque.       Aichinger took …   Universalium

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