Feast of the Ascension
Feast of the Ascension
    Feast of the Ascension
     Catholic_Encyclopedia Feast of the Ascension
    See also The Fact of the Ascension.
    The fortieth day after Easter Sunday, commemorating the Ascension of Christ into heaven, according to Mark 16:19, Luke 24:51, and Acts 1:2.
    In the Eastern Church this feast was known as analepsis, the taking up, and also as the episozomene, the salvation, denoting that by ascending into His glory Christ completed the work of our redemption. The terms used in the West, ascensio and, occasionally, ascensa, signify that Christ was raised up by His own powers. Tradition designates Mount Olivet near Bethany as the place where Christ left the earth. The feast falls on Thursday. It is one of the Ecumenical feasts ranking with the feasts of the Passion, of Easter and of Pentecost among the most solemn in the calendar, has a vigil and, since the fifteenth century, an octave which is set apart for a novena of preparation for Pentecost, in accordance with the directions of Leo XIII.
    History. The observance of this feast is of great antiquity. Although no documentary evidence of it exists prior to the beginning of the fifth century, St. Augustine says that it is of Apostolic origin, and he speaks of it in a way that shows it was the universal observance of the Church long before his time. Frequent mention of it is made in the writings of St. John Chrysostom, St. Gregory of Nyssa, and in the Constitution of the Apostles. The Pilgrimage of Sylvia (Peregrinatio Etheriae) speaks of the vigil of this feast and of the feast itself, as they were kept in the church built over the grotto in Bethlehem in which Christ was born (Duchesne, Christian Worship, 491-515). It may be that prior to the fifth century the fact narrated in the Gospels was commemorated in conjunction with the feast of Easter or Pentecost. Some believe that the much-disputed forty-third decree of the Council of Elvira (c. 300) condemning the practice of observing a feast on the fortieth day after Easter and neglecting to keep Pentecost on the fiftieth day, implies that the proper usage of the time was to commemorate the Ascension along with Pentecost. Representations of the mystery are found in diptychs and frescoes dating as early as the fifth century.
    Customs. Certain customs were connected with the liturgy of this feast, such as the blessing of beans and grapes after the Commemoration of the Dead in the Canon of the Mass, the blessing of first fruits, afterwards done on Rogation Days, the blessing of a candle, the wearing of mitres by deacon ( see Deacons ) and subdeacon, the extinction of the paschal candle, and triumphal processions with torches and banners outside the churches to commemorate the entry of Christ into heaven. Rock records the English custom of carrying at the head of the procession the banner bearing the device of the lion and at the foot the banner of the dragon, to symbolize the triumph of Christ in His ascension over the evil one. In some churches the scene of the Ascension was vividly reproduced by elevating the figure of Christ above the altar through an opening in the roof of the church. In others, whilst the figure of Christ was made to ascend, that of the devil was made to descend.
    In the liturgies generally the day is meant to celebrate the completion of the work of our salvation, the pledge of our glorification with Christ, and His entry into heaven with our human nature glorified.
    DUCHESNE, Christian Worship (London, 1904); NILLES Kalendarium Utriusque Ecclesiae (Innsbruck, 1897), II. 362-374; CABROL, in Dict. d'arch. chrét. et liturg. BUTLER, Feasts and Fasts; GUÉRANGER, III, s. v.
    JOHN J. WYNNE
    Transcribed by the Cloistered Dominican Nuns of the Monastery of the Infant Jesus, Lufkin, Texas Dedicated to Christ the King

The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VIII. — New York: Robert Appleton Company. . 1910.


Catholic encyclopedia.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Feast of the Assumption —     The Feast of the Assumption     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► The Feast of the Assumption     The Feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, 15 August; also called in old liturgical books Pausatio, Nativitas (for heaven), Mors, Depositio …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus — The Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus is celebrated in the Roman Catholic liturgical calendar observance found in the liturgical calendar, at least at local level, since the end of the fifteenth century. The veneration of the Holy Name was extended …   Wikipedia

  • Ascension, Feast of the — • The fortieth day after Easter Sunday, commemorating the Ascension of Christ into heaven, according to Mark 16:19, Luke 24:51, and Acts 1:2 Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006 …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Feast of Tabernacles (Christian holiday) — The Feast of Tabernacles is an eight day Biblical pilgrimage festival, also known as the Feast of Booths, the Festival of Tabernacles, or Tabernacles. it is celebrated by a small number of Christians who have revived some Old Testament festivals …   Wikipedia

  • Christ the King, Feast of — ▪ Roman Catholic festival       festival celebrated in the Roman Catholic church in honour of Jesus Christ as lord over all creation. Essentially a magnification of the Feast of the Ascension, it was established by Pope Pius XI in 1925.… …   Universalium

  • Great Feasts of the Orthodox Church — The feast of the Resurrection of Jesus, called Pascha (Easter), is the greatest of the feasts of the Eastern Orthodox Church. In addition, there are other days of great importance in the life of the Church the Twelve Great Feasts. The Twelve… …   Wikipedia

  • Reform of the Roman Breviary by Pope Pius X — The Reform of the Roman Breviary by Pope Pius X was promulgated by that Pope with the Apostolic Constitution Divino Afflatu of 1 November 1911.The Roman Breviary is the title of the book obligatorily used for celebrating the Roman Rite Divine… …   Wikipedia

  • History of the Roman Catholic Church — The History of the Catholic Church from apostolic times covers a period of nearly 2,000 years, [August Franzen, Kleine Kirchengeschichte Neubearbeitung, Herder,Freiburg,1988, p.11] making it the world s oldest and largest institution. It dates… …   Wikipedia

  • St. Peter, Prince of the Apostles —     St. Peter, Prince of the Apostles     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► St. Peter, Prince of the Apostles     The life of St. Peter may be conveniently considered under the following heads:     I. Until the Ascension of Christ     II. St. Peter in… …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Miracle of the Moose — Venerable Macarius Miracle of the Moose (Russian: Чудо преподобного Макария Унженского о лосе) is a miracle associated with the name of Venerable Macarius of the Yellow Water Lake and the Unzha (1349 1444), a Saint of the Russian Orthodox Church …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”