Blessed Sebastian Newdigate
Blessed Sebastian Newdigate
    Bl. Sebastian Newdigate
     Catholic_Encyclopedia Bl. Sebastian Newdigate
    Executed at Tyburn, 19 June, 1535. A younger son of John Newdigate of Harefield Place, Middlesex, king's sergeant, and Amphelys, daughter and heiress of John Nevill of Sutton, Lincolnshire. He was educated at Cambridge, and on going to Court became and intimate friend of Henry VIII and a privy councillor. He married and had a daughter, named Amphelys, but his wife dying in 1524, he entered the London Chaterhouse and became a monk there. He signed the Oath of Succession "in as far as the law of God permits", 6 June, 1534. Arrested on 25 May, 1535, for denying the king's supremacy, he was thrown into the Marshalsea prison, where he was kept for fourteen days bound to a pillar, standing upright, with iron rings round his neck, hands, and feet. There he was visited by the king who offered to load him with riches and honours if he would conform. He was then brought before the Council, and sent to the Tower, where Henry visited him again. His trial took place, 11 June, and after condemnation he was sent back to the Tower. With him suffered Blessed William Exmew and Blessed Humphrey Middlemore.
    JOHN B. WAINEWRIGHT
    Transcribed by Christine J. Murray

The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VIII. — New York: Robert Appleton Company. . 1910.


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