Abbey of Croyland
Abbey of Croyland
    Abbey of Croyland
     Catholic_Encyclopedia Abbey of Croyland
    (Or Crowland.)
    A monastery of the Benedictine Order in Lincolnshire, sixteen miles from Stamford and thirteen from Peterborough. It was founded in memory of St. Guthlac, early in the eighth century, by Ethelbald, King of Mercia, but was entirely destroyed and the community slaughtered by the Danes in 866. Refounded in the reign of King Edred, it was again destroyed by fire in 1091, but rebuilt about twenty years later by Abbot Joffrid. In 1170 the greater part of the abbey and church was once more burnt down and once more rebuilt, under Abbot Edward. From this time the history of Croyland was one of growing and almost unbroken prosperity down to the time of the Dissolution. Richly endowed by royal and noble visitors to the shrine of St. Guthlac, it became one of the most opulent of East Anglian abbeys; and owning to its isolated position in the heart of the fen country, its security and peace were comparatively undisturbed during the great civil wars and other national troubles. The first abbot (in Ethelbald's reign) is said to have been Kenulph, a monk of Evesham; and one of the most notable was Ingulphus, who ruled from 1075 to 1109, and whose pseudo-chronicle was long considered the chief authority for the history of the abbey, though it is now acknowledged to be a compilation of the fifteenth century. At the time of the Dissolution the abbot was John Welles, or Bridges, who with his twenty-seven monks subscribed to the Royal Supremacy in 1534, and five years later surrendered his house to the king. The revenue of the abbey at this time has been variously estimated at 1083 and 1217 pounds. The site and buildings were granted in Edward VI s reign to Edward Lord Clinton, and afterwards came into the possession of the Hunter family. The remains of the abbey were fortified by the Royalists in 1643, and besieged and taken by Cromwell in May of that year. The abbey church comprised a nave of nine bays with aisles, 183 feet long by 87 wide, an apsidal choir of five bays 90 feet long, a central tower and detached bell-tower at the east end. The existing remains consist of the north aisle, still used (as it was from the earliest times) as the parish church; the splendid west front, the lower (twelfth century) and the upper part (fourteenth century) elaborately decorated with arcading and statues, it is thought in imitation of Wells cathedral; and a few piers and arches of the nave. Much careful restoration and repair has been carried out since 1860, under Sir Gilbert Scott, Mr. J.L. Pearson, and other eminent architects.
    D.O. HUNTER-BLAIR
    Transcribed by Michael C. Tinkler

The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume VIII. — New York: Robert Appleton Company. . 1910.


Catholic encyclopedia.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Croyland, Abbey of — • A monastery of the Benedictine Order in Lincolnshire Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006 …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Twiketal of Croyland — • English abbot (d. 975) Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Twiketal of Croyland     Twiketal of Croyland     † …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Croyland Abbey — It was originally founded in the 8th century, and is dedicated to Saint Mary the Virgin, Saint Bartholomew and Saint Guthlac, the last of these having dwelt there as a hermit between 699 and 714. During the third quarter of the 10th century,… …   Wikipedia

  • Croyland Chronicle — The Croyland Chronicle (or Crowland Chronicle ) is an important, if not always reliable, primary source for English medieval history, in particular the late fifteenth century. It was written at the Benedictine Abbey of Croyland, in Lincolnshire,… …   Wikipedia

  • Croyland Abbey, Wellingborough — Croyland Abbey. Croyland Abbey is an historic building, originally a manor house but now offices, in Wellingborough in the English county of Northamptonshire. The building is named after Croyland Abbey in Lincol …   Wikipedia

  • Croyland Chronicle —    For the period 1459 to 1485, the two accounts known as the First and Second Continuations of the Croyland Chronicle are valuable sources of information. While the First Continuation supplies details for events in the 1460s, the Second… …   Encyclopedia of the Wars of the Roses

  • Crowland Abbey — Croyland Abbey Croyland Abbey Denomination Church of England Churchmanship Broad Church Website …   Wikipedia

  • Ingulphe de Croyland — Ruines de l abbaye de Croyland (Crowland, Lincolnshire), fondée au VIIIe siècle. Ingulphe[1] de Croyland (v. 1030 † 17 d …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Constitutional status of Cornwall — The flag of Cornwall (Kernow) Cornwall is currently administered as a unitary authority and ceremonial county of England.[1] However, a number of organisations and individuals [2] question the constitutional basis for …   Wikipedia

  • University of Cambridge —     University of Cambridge     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► University of Cambridge     I. ORIGIN AND HISTORY     The obscurity which surrounds the ancient history of Cambridge makes it impossible to fix with any certainty the date of the… …   Catholic encyclopedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”